Articles for November 2017

Happy Thanksgiving!

Thanksgiving gives us all a chance to reflect on the people we know, the things we have, and the great experiences and richness life brings. Taking time out of our busy lives to remember the good things is important.  This holiday, so synonymous with gratitude, is the perfect time to count our blessings.

Reflect on your present blessings, of which every many has many,                                    Not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

-Charles Dickens

We wish you and your family have a happy Thanksgiving Day!

Mike Moffitt may be reached at Ph# 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

    

Crowdfunding & Taxes

Information for those giving, receiving, and organizing.

Have you donated money to a crowdfunding campaign this year? You probably have. You may be wondering how the Internal Revenue Service treats these donations. Do the common tax rules apply?

 The I.R.S. may or may not define such donations as charitable contributions. It depends not only on who the crowdfunding is for, but also who has organized the campaign.

A donation to a qualified non-profit organization – a 501(c)(3) – is tax deductible if it is properly documented and itemized on Schedule A. Donations to crowdsourcing efforts administered by 501(c)(3)s are, likewise, tax deductible.1

If an individual sets up a crowdfunding campaign to raise money for another individual or a cause or project, it is highly unlikely that a 501(c)(3) organization is in place to accept the donations. (An organization can attain such status faster these days, thanks to the Internet, but attaining it still takes time.)

So, if you donate to a crowdfunding campaign that is simply created by a person to benefit a specific person or a group of specific persons, the donation will likely not be tax deductible, as no qualified charitable organization will be there to receive and distribute the money.1

There is a “middle ground” here that warrants further explanation. Sometimes you see a crowdsourcing effort created by an individual on behalf of what is termed a “charitable class.” These campaigns do not simply benefit one or more people that the organizer already knows. Rather, they benefit a community of people (perhaps, many people) that the organizer does not know.

If you give to such an effort, an income tax deduction may be possible if the campaign aligns with a qualified charity. If the qualified non-profit organization assumes full control over the collected donations and takes full possession of them, then a charitable deduction by the donor may be permitted.2

When donations are taken on behalf of a charitable class, they do not necessarily become present interest gifts. Still, a gift tax charitable contribution deduction may not be allowed.2

If you receive crowdsourcing contributions, are they characterized as gifts? Usually, they are considered gifts under federal tax law and not counted in your gross income – but there are some exceptions to this.2

If a donation you receive constitutes a loan, or if a donation is made to you with what the I.R.S. calls “detached and disinterested generosity,” then such a donation represents taxable income. The same holds true if crowdfunding donations amount to venture capital, payment for services rendered, or a percentage of gain from the sale of property.2

Some creators of crowdfunding campaigns may receive 1099-Ks. This is the federal tax form used to report payment card and third-party network transactions, and like all 1099 forms, it goes out within the first few weeks of a calendar year. If your campaign generates at least 200 transactions or $20,000 or more in gross payments during a single year, the crowdfunding site or the payment processing company it uses will send you one.1

The I.R.S. has not made formal rulings on crowdsourcing. Perhaps some will be made soon, if only to clarify some of the gray areas that now exist.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com.

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.   

Citations.

1 – legalzoom.com/articles/cash-and-kickstarter-the-tax-implications-of-crowd-funding [3/17]

2 – wealthmanagement.com/philanthropy/crowdsourcing-tax-confusion [10/20/17]

 

Finding Cheaper Flights

Ways to fly for less this season and any season.

What are the keys to landing inexpensive airfares? One, be flexible. Two, secure those seats now rather than later.

Locating cheaper airfares can be done through a variety of means. Try excellent search engines like Momondo (which canvasses more than 30 carriers and travel websites), Priceline, and Google Flights. Many travel websites will let you set price alerts so that you can be quickly notified when a carrier drops a fare into the “sweet spot” you want. (Fares really can rise and fall daily.) Book your airfare at least 30 days before you fly, and consider flights with connections rather than non-stops. Fly during the middle of the week – or if life permits, on an actual holiday. Go with the discount carriers – JetBlue, Southwest Airlines, or Alaska Airlines if you are flying domestically, or Norwegian, if traveling to Europe. Additionally, awards miles and credits accumulated on travel credit cards could lower the cost of your trip. Also, if you book a flight directly through a carrier via an airline rewards card, you can usually waive a baggage fee for at least one flyer.3  

Mike Moffitt may be reached at Ph# 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.   

Citations.

3 – forbes.com/sites/johnnyjet/2017/10/06/10-tips-for-booking-cheaper-flights/ [10/6/17]

Your Social Security Benefits & Your Provisional Income

Earning too much may cause portions of your retirement benefits to be taxed. 

You may be shocked to learn that part of your Social Security income could be taxed. If your provisional income exceeds a certain level, that will happen.

Just what is “provisional income”? The Social Security Administration defines it with a formula.

Provisional income = your modified adjusted gross income + 50% of your total annual Social Security benefits + 100% of tax-exempt interest that your investments generate.1

Income from working, pension income, withdrawals of money from IRAs and other types of retirement plans, and interest earned by certain kinds of fixed-income investment vehicles all figure into this formula.

If you fail to manage your provisional income in retirement, it may top the threshold at which Social Security benefits become taxable. This could drastically affect the amount of spending power you have, and it could force you to withdraw more money than you expect in order to cover taxes.

Where is the provisional income threshold set? The answer to that question depends on your filing status.

If you file your federal income taxes as an individual, then up to 50% of your annual Social Security benefits are subject to taxation once your provisional income surpasses $25,000. Once it exceeds $34,000, as much as 85% of your benefits are exposed to taxation.1,2

The thresholds are set higher for joint filers. If you file jointly, as much as 50% of your Social Security benefits may be taxed when your provisional income rises above $32,000. Above $44,000, up to 85% of your Social Security benefits become taxable.2

The provisional income thresholds have never been adjusted for inflation. Since Social Security needs more money flowing into its coffers rather than less, it is doubtful they will be reset anytime in the future.

When the thresholds were put into place in 1983, just 10% of Social Security recipients had their retirement benefits taxed. By 2015, that had climbed to more than 50%.2

In 2017, the Seniors Center, a nonprofit senior advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C., asked retirees how they felt about their Social Security benefits being taxed. Ninety-one percent felt the practice should end.2

How can you plan to avoid hitting the provisional income thresholds? First, be wary of potential jumps in income, such as the kind that might result from selling a lot of stock, converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, or taking a large lump-sum payout from a retirement account. Second, you could plan to reduce or shelter the amount of income that your investments return. Three, you could try to accelerate income into one tax year or push it off into another tax year.

Consult with a financial professional to explore strategies that might help you reduce your provisional income. You may have more options for doing so than you think.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at Ph# 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Citations.

1 – kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T051-C032-S014-can-you-cut-taxes-you-pay-on-your-social-security.html [9/13/17]

2 – fool.com/retirement/2017/03/26/91-of-seniors-believe-this-social-security-practic.aspx [3/26/17]