Articles tagged with: business

Congress Gives Some “Holiday Gifts” to Taxpayers

Some key federal tax breaks are made permanent…at last.

During the past few Decembers, taxpayers and tax preparers have waited anxiously for Congress to rescue expiring federal tax provisions. Usually, legislators pass an eleventh-hour bill to extend certain tax perks for another year and reinstate them for the current year.

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015, or PATH – just passed by Congress, just signed into law by President Obama – not only renews 52 expiring tax provisions but makes some permanent. You may be a taxpayer who benefits from its passage.1,2,

Would you like to make a tax-free transfer of IRA assets to a charity? PATH makes that opportunity permanently available to you. A traditional IRA owner at least 70½ years old may make a charitable gift from that IRA to a qualified charity and exclude the transferred amount from their gross income for the tax year in which the gift is made. This is a tax-efficient move for wealthy, older IRA owners who see their annual Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) as more of a tax issue than a necessity.3

Does your business do any research or development? The federal R&D tax credit is now permanent – and in a sense, even sweeter. Any company with less than $50 million in gross receipts may use the R&D credit to counter the Alternative Minimum Tax next year and every year. Thanks to PATH, even some start-ups not yet facing income tax may be able to offset payroll taxes via this credit.2

Are you thinking about remodeling your restaurant or retail business? PATH preserves and makes permanent the 15-year period for depreciating remodeling and other improvements. No going back to the old 39-year period.3

Are you hoping those bigger Section 179 deduction limits will remain in place? They will. PATH preserves the current $500,000 immediate deduction limit of the cost of qualifying asset acquisitions, and the current phase-out starting at $2 million. Going forward, both of these thresholds will be inflation-indexed. In related news, PATH also keeps the 50% “bonus depreciation” provision in place through 2017 and extends it to restaurants and retail businesses that are owned as well as leased.2,3

Do you take advantage of the Child Tax Credit? In 2009, the CTC was enhanced to offer parents a $1,000 credit per qualifying child plus an additional (refundable) tax credit equal to 15% of any earned income over $3,000. This $3,000 threshold (which was set to return to the $10,000 level in 2017) becomes permanent thanks to PATH.2

Would you like to claim the American Opportunity Tax Credit? If so, you will be pleased to know that this college education credit will not shrink to $1,800 in 2017. It will remain at $2,500 thanks to PATH. The current phase-out levels ($80,000 for single filers, $160,000 for joint filers) will also remain in place.2

Do you live where there are no state income taxes? PATH makes the itemized federal deduction for state and local sales taxes a permanent option for you.2

Are you a teacher who takes the above-the-line deduction for K-12 school supplies? PATH makes that deduction permanent as well and indexes it for inflation.2

Businesses get a 2-year reprieve from the Cadillac tax. Companies sponsoring high-priced health insurance plans will not have to face this tax until 2018 thanks to PATH.3

PATH suspends the 2.3% excise tax on medical devices for 2 years. This tax, which represents 2.3% of what importers and manufacturers pay on sales of certain healthcare equipment, will resurface in 2018.3

PATH extends some tax perks only through 2016. Most notably, it continues the tax exclusion on canceled home loan debt for another year. It also preserves the current $4,000 limit for the above-the-line tuition deduction for college education.2

Tax breaks rewarding homeowners, homebuilders, and contractors for energy efficiency are also preserved for another year by PATH. Builders and contractors may still take advantage of a credit as large as $2,000 for manufacturing energy-efficient residences, and the 179D deduction is still available for those who build green or make qualifying HVAC and lighting improvements to commercial properties. Home energy tax credits of up to $500 will still reward taxpayers who make energy-saving upgrades to their primary residence.2

PATH may be your route to some significant tax savings. You will have to act fast to claim them for 2015, but you have plenty of time to take advantage of these opportunities in 2016.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email mikem@cfgiowa.com.
Website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – thehill.com/blogs/pundits-blog/economy-budget/263889-tax-extenders-on-the-road-to-tax-reform [12/18/15]
2 – forbes.com/sites/anthonynitti/2015/12/16/permanent-rd-higher-section-179-expensing-highlight-tentative-deal-on-tax-extenders/ [12/16/15]
3 – accountingtoday.com/news/tax-practice/congress-makes-some-tax-extenders-permanent-76718-1.html [12/16/15]

The Difference Between Good & Bad Debt

Some debts are worth assuming, but others exert a drag on retirement saving.

Who will retire with substantial debt? It seems many baby boomers will – too many. In a 2014 Employee Benefit Research Institute survey, 44% of boomers reported that they were concerned about the size of their household debt. While many are carrying mortgages, paying with plastic also exerts a drag on their finances. According to credit reporting agency Experian, boomers are the generation holding the most credit cards (an average of 2.66 per person) and the biggest average per-person credit card balance ($5,347).1,2

Indebtedness plagues all generations – and that is why the distinction between good debt and bad debt should be recognized.

What distinguishes a good debt from a bad one? A good debt is purposeful – the borrower assumes it in pursuit of an important life or financial objective, such as homeownership or a college degree. A good debt also gives a borrower long-term potential to make money exceeding the money borrowed. Good debts commonly have both of these characteristics.

In contrast, bad debts are taken on for comparatively trivial reasons, and are usually arranged through credit cards that may charge the borrower double-digit interest (not a small factor in the $5,347 average credit card balance cited above).

Some people break it down further. Thomas Anderson – an executive director of wealth management at Morgan Stanley and the author of the best-selling The Value of Debt in Retirement – identifies three kinds of indebtedness. Oppressive debt is debt at 10% or greater interest, a payday loan being a classic example. Working debt comes with much less interest and may be tax-deductible (think mortgage payments), so it may be worth carrying.3

Taking a page from corporate finance, Anderson also introduces the concept of enriching debt –strategic debt assumed with the certainty than it can be erased at any time. In the enriching debt model, an individual “captures the spread” – he or she borrows from an investment portfolio to pay off student loans, or pays little or nothing down on a home and invests the lump sum saved into equity investments whose rate of return may exceed the mortgage interest. This is not exactly a mainstream approach, but Anderson has argued that it is a wise one, telling the Washington Post that “the second you pay down your house, it’s a one-way liquidity trap, especially for retirees.”3,4

Mortgage debt is the largest debt for most new retirees. According to the American College, the average new retiree carries $100,000 in home loan debt. That certainly amounts to good debt for most people.3

Student loans usually amount to good debt, but not necessarily for the increasing numbers of retiring baby boomers who carry them. Education loans have become the second-largest debt for this demographic, and in some cases retirees are paying off loans taken out for their children or grandchildren.3

Credit card and auto loan debt also factor into the picture. Some contend that an auto loan is actually a good debt because borrower has purchased a durable good, but the interest rates and minimal odds of appreciation for cars and trucks suggest otherwise.

Some households lack budgets. In others, the budget is reliant on everything is going well. Either case opens a door for the accumulation of bad debts.

The fifties are crucial years for debt management. The years from 50-59 may represent the peak earning years for an individual, yet they may also bring peak indebtedness with money going out for everything from mortgage payments to eldercare to child support. As many baby boomers will retire with debt, the reality is that their retirement income will need to be large enough to cover those obligations.

How much debt are you carrying today? Whether you want to retire debt-free or live with some debt after you sell your business or end your career, you need to maintain the financial capacity to address it and/or eradicate it. Speak with a financial professional about your options.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at  ph# 641-782-5577 or email:  mikem@cfgiowa.com

website:  www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.  

Citations.

1 – foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2015/03/26/strategic-debt-can-help-in-retirement/ [3/26/15]

2 – gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/19-easy-ways-baby-boomers-can-build-credit/ [4/23/15]

3 – usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/brooks/2015/04/22/retirement-401k-debt-mortgage/25837369/ [4/22/15]

4 – washingtonpost.com/news/get-there/wp/2015/03/26/the-case-for-not-paying-off-your-mortgage-by-retirement/ [3/26/15]