Articles tagged with: debt crisis

Puerto Rico Defaults

The island’s debt crisis worsens. Will Congress act before July 1?

On May 2, Puerto Rico defaulted on its debt again. As it managed to negotiate with some of its creditors, its Government Development Bank did pay part of the $422 million it owed this week, but about $270 million in payments were missed.1,2

Puerto Rico’s fiscal crisis made headlines last year when its total debt passed $70 billion, more than any U.S. state except for New York and California. Its government has defaulted three times on its debt since the start of 2015.3,4

Puerto Rico has been in a recession for the better part of a decade. About 45% of Puerto Ricans live in poverty, and people are leaving the commonwealth at a rate of 1,500 a week. Its schools, hospitals, and social services programs have already been hit with severe budget cuts.3,5

On May 1, Governor Alejandro García Padilla called the default “a painful decision,” but also a necessary one. Faced simultaneously with “the inability to meet the demands of our creditors and the needs of our people, I had to make a choice. I decided that essential services for the 3.5 million American citizens in Puerto Rico came first.”5

July 1 presents a critical deadline. On that day, the commonwealth must make about $2 billion in debt payments. Analysts are highly skeptical that Puerto Rico will be able to do that.1

Will Congress intervene? The pressure is certainly mounting on Capitol Hill lawmakers.

Will a bailout be necessary? Maybe not. Last spring, the House Natural Resources Committee attempted to put together a relief bill in response to the crisis. If passed, it would not represent a bailout, as it would not deliver any federal money to Puerto Rico. The bill is still in the works.1

In 2015, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) gave Congress a March 31, 2016 deadline to address this issue, but that deadline came and went without action. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and the White House implored Congress to address the problem this week. In a letter to congressional leaders, Lew stated that minus “a workable framework for restructuring Puerto Rico’s debts, bondholders will experience a lengthy, disorderly, and chaotic unwinding, with non-payment for many a real possibility.”1,2

Lew also warned that without legislation including “appropriate restructuring and oversight tools, a taxpayer-funded bailout may become the only legislative course available to address an escalating crisis.” Since Puerto Rico is not a state, a Chapter 9 bankruptcy is not an option.4,5

What does this mean for bond investors? Greater levels of concern. American investors have bought Puerto Rico’s bonds for years, as they are exempt from federal and state income tax. Earlier this year, the commonwealth defaulted on $37 million of bonds issued by the Puerto Rico Infrastructure Financing Authority, which were not constitutionally backed. This week, Puerto Rico defaulted on bonds backed by its Government Development Bank. If the GDB cannot make the huge debt payment due July 1, then Puerto Rico will default on some of the general obligation bonds issued by its government.4

Most municipal bond funds have sold off their Puerto Rican debt and have not been greatly affected by these developments. Small investors holding Puerto Rican debt can take some solace in the fact that several Puerto Rican bonds are insured; in case of a default, the principal and interest would be protected by a bond insurance company. Contrast that with the plight of the funds still heavily invested in distressed Puerto Rican debt; as the commonwealth cannot declare bankruptcy, they may have to turn to regular courts in pursuit of payouts.4

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-464-2248 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com
Website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – thehill.com/policy/finance/278352-puerto-rico-defaults-as-islands-governor-pushes-congress [5/2/16]
2 – fortune.com/2016/05/03/puerto-rico-default-more-political-fallout-than-market-impact/ [5/3/16]
3 – bloombergview.com/quicktake/puerto-ricos-slide [4/28/16]
4 – abcnews.go.com/Business/wireStory/qa-puerto-ricos-debt-crisis-explained-38803972 [5/2/16]
5 – usatoday.com/story/money/2016/05/01/puerto-rico-expected-default-further-debts/83794076/ [5/1/16]

The Troubling National Debt

It is projected to grow even larger. What does that imply for the economy?

In 1835, something financially remarkable happened: the federal government paid off the national debt.1

It hasn’t happened since. Through myriad presidential administrations and economic cycles, the national debt has persisted. Wars, depressions and recessions have all helped send it higher, and while it can shrink in the short term, it isn’t going away. Currently it stands at $17.6 trillion, with $12.6 trillion of it held by the public.2

The big picture is disconcerting. In fall 2013, the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office said that the national debt amounted to 73% of U.S. Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The CBO sees it declining to 68% of GDP by 2018, but then increasing to 71% by 2023 as a consequence of rising interest rates and spending boosts for Social Security and health care. CBO projections have the country’s debt equaling 100% of its annualized growth by 2038 – a milestone best not reached or approached.3

If the national debt should grow over the next decade, what would the impact be? It would be felt subtly, but it would be notable.

The greater the U.S. debt-per-capita, the greater the default risk for the federal government – meaning that newly issued Treasuries would need to have higher yields to appeal to investors. A bigger percentage of federal tax revenue would go toward paying the interest on the national debt, leaving fewer tax dollars for federal services and programs. Consequently, borrowing for economic enhancement projects would become harder, with a reduced standard of living for American households as a possible byproduct.4

Higher Treasury yields have three distinct implications. They can lessen appetite for risk; if the yields on Treasuries start to look pretty good compared to the returns on equities or corporate securities, investors may run to the “risk-free” Treasuries. Indirectly, this could encourage more inflation: higher Treasury yields could prompt yields on corporate securities to rise, which would force those corporations to hike prices on goods and services, i.e., inflation. Lastly, mortgages would become costlier as their interest rates are linked to Treasury yields and the short-term interest rates established by the Federal Reserve. Costlier mortgages imply fewer homebuyers, which in turn leads to lower home prices and reduced net worth for homeowners.4

Under current projections, what might happen by 2038? If America reaches to a point where its debt does roughly equal its GDP, a considerable economic price could be paid. In addition to a loss of confidence on the part of foreign investors, you would have a loss of flexibility on the part of the federal government.

Other nations might lose faith in our ability to pay our debt obligations. If that happens, we would find it harder or more expensive to borrow money. More and more federal borrowing could discourage private investment (although incomes and inflation-adjusted output could still rise). If the federal government needed to spend ever-increasing amounts of money to pay down the interest on the nation’s debt, shifts in fiscal policy and significant tax law changes would no doubt occur. The greater the percentage of federal spending given over to the national debt, the less capable the federal government would be to respond to an economic, geopolitical or environmental crisis.

The CBO’s forecast has sounded an alarm, and some view the national debt crisis as an emerging national security issue.

We incur some debt to foster economic expansion. Take the recent federal stimulus programs, for example. Taking on debt of that kind can be worthwhile as a step toward economic recovery. It is the other kind of debt – debt in response to today’s consumption – that risks handing future generations dilemmas.

While an ever-increasing national debt is a problem, a manageable national debt we can live with. We can’t turn back the clock to 1835. Andrew Jackson’s early struggles with debt as a land speculator led to his dream of a debt-free America with a federal government that didn’t need any credit. By selling off huge chunks of federal land and vetoing every spending bill that came his way, the seventh President cut the federal deficit from $58 million to $0 in six years. Coincidentally or not, a lengthy depression soon began.1

Michael Moffitt may be reached at phone: (641) 782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com
website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

The Congressional Budget Office is a non-partisan arm of Congress, established in 1974, to provide Congress with non-partisan scoring of budget proposals.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a country’s borders in a specific time period, though GDP is usually calculated on an annual basis. It includes all of private and public consumption government outlays, investments and exports less imports that occur within a defined territory.

Government bonds and Treasury bills are guaranteed by the U.S. government as to the timely payment of principal and interest and, if held to maturity, offer a fixed rate of return and fixed principal value. However, the value of fund shares is not guaranteed and will fluctuate.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – npr.org/blogs/money/2011/04/15/135423586/when-the-u-s-paid-off-the-entire-national-debt-and-why-it-didnt-last [4/15/11]
2 – treasurydirect.gov/NP/debt/current [6/19/14]
3 – cbo.gov/publication/44521 [9/17/13]
4 – investopedia.com/articles/economics/10/national-debt.asp [10/11/13]