Articles tagged with: investments

Live Long, Stay Invested

There was a time when more than 90% of American men older than age 65 worked. To be precise, that time was 1870. Back then, retirement was unheard of; in an economy that was still labor-intensive and largely agricultural, anyone capable of working at that age kept at it.

Today, Americans typically retire in their early sixties. While some may work much longer, a retirement lasting 20 to 30 years may turn out to be the more-common experience. What does this mean for retirees, financially? Baby boomers leaving work might have to accept the level of investment risk they do now once retired. Many retirees may be challenged to live merely off Social Security benefits and dividends, with interest rates still not far from historic lows, and even 2% inflation will reduce the purchasing power of an uninvested dollar by almost 50% over 30 years. Moreover, some boomers need to build greater retirement savings. Though we could see more Americans working past age 65 in the near future, many people may still want or need to retire before that age, and if you are among them, you may need to take short-term income needs and long-term investing objectives into account.2

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email:  mikem@cfgiowa.com

Website:  www.cfgiowa.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Securities and Registered Investment Advisory Services offered through Silver Oak Securities, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC. Silver Oak Securities, Inc. and Cornerstone Financial Group are separate entities.

Citations.

2-fortune.com/2019/07/10/you-might-have-longer-than-you-think-to-invest-for-retirement[7/10/19]

Your Year-End Financial Checklist

Seven aspects of your financial life to review as the year draws to a close.

The end of a year makes us think about last-minute things we need to address and good habits we want to start keeping. To that end, here are seven aspects of your financial life to think about as this year leads into the next…

Your investments. Review your approach to investing and make sure it suits your objectives. Look over your portfolio positions and revisit your asset allocation.

Your retirement planning strategy. Does it seem as practical as it did a few years ago? Are you able to max out contributions to IRAs and workplace retirement plans like 401(k)s? Is it time to make catch-up contributions? Finally, consider Roth IRA conversion scenarios, and whether the potential tax-free retirement distributions tomorrow seem worth the taxes you may incur today. If you are at the age when a Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) is required from your traditional IRA(s), be sure to take your RMD by December 31. If you don’t, the IRS will assess a penalty of 50% of the RMD amount on top of the taxes you will already pay on that income. (While you can postpone your very first IRA RMD until April 1, 2017, that forces you into taking two RMDs next year, both taxable events.)1

Your tax situation. How many potential credits and/or deductions can you and your accountant find before the year ends? Have your CPA craft a year-end projection including Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). In years past, some business owners and executives didn’t really look into deductions and credits because they just assumed they would be hit by the AMT. The recent rise in the top marginal tax bracket (to 39.6%) made fewer high-earning executives and business owners subject to the AMT – their ordinary income tax liabilities grew. That calls for a closer look at accelerated depreciation, R&D credits, the Work Opportunity Tax Credit, incentive stock options, and certain types of tax-advantaged investments.2

Review any sales of appreciated property and both realized and unrealized losses and gains. Take a look back at last year’s loss carry-forwards. If you’ve sold securities, gather up cost-basis information. Look for any transactions that could potentially enhance your circumstances.

Your charitable gifting goals. Plan charitable contributions or contributions to education accounts, and make any desired cash gifts to family members. The annual federal gift tax exclusion is $14,000 per individual for 2016, meaning you can gift as much as $14,000 to as many individuals as you like this year tax-free. A married couple can gift up to $28,000 tax-free to as many individuals as they like. The gifts do count against the lifetime estate tax exemption amount, which is $5.45 million per individual and $10.9 million per married couple for 2016.3

You could also gift appreciated securities to a charity. If you have owned them for more than a year, you can deduct 100% of their fair market value and legally avoid capital gains tax you would normally incur from selling them.4

Besides outright gifts, you can plan other financial moves on behalf of your family – you can create and fund trusts, for example. The end of the year is a good time to review any trusts you have in place.

Your life insurance coverage. Are your policies and beneficiaries up-to-date? Review premium costs, beneficiaries, and any and all life events that may have altered your coverage needs.

Speaking of life events…did you happen to get married or divorced in 2016? Did you move or change jobs? Buy a home or business? Did you lose a family member, or see a severe illness or ailment affect a loved one? Did you reach the point at which Mom or Dad needed assisted living? Was there a new addition to your family this year? Did you receive an inheritance or a gift? All of these circumstances can have a financial impact on your life, the way you invest and plan for retirement, and how you wind down your career or business. They are worth discussing with the financial or tax professional you know and trust.

Lastly, did you reach any of these financially important ages in 2016? If so, act accordingly.

Did you turn 70½ this year? If so, you must now take Required Minimum Distributions (RMDs) from your IRA(s).

Did you turn 65 this year? If so, you are likely now eligible to apply for Medicare.

Did you turn 62 this year? If so, you can choose to apply for Social Security benefits.

Did you turn 59½ this year? If so, you may take IRA distributions without a 10% penalty.

Did you turn 55 this year? If so, you may be allowed to take distributions from your 401(k) account without penalty, provided you no longer work for that employer.

Did you turn 50 this year? If so, you can make “catch-up” contributions to IRAs (and certain qualified retirement plans).1,5

The end of the year is a key time to review your financial “health” & well-being. If you feel you need to address any of the items above, please feel free to give me a call.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email:  mikem@cfgiowa.com.

Website:  www.cfgiowa.com    

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.  

Citations.

1 – fool.com/retirement/general/2016/04/11/required-minimum-distributions-common-questions-ab.aspx [4/11/16]

2 – nerdwallet.com/blog/taxes/income-taxes/federal-income-tax-brackets/ [9/8/16]

3 – turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/Tax-Planning-and-Checklists/The-Gift-Tax-Made-Simple/INF12127.html [11/7/16]

4 – marketwatch.com/story/what-to-know-when-deducting-charitable-donations-2016-02-23 [2/23/16]

5 – merrilledge.com/Publish/Content/application/pdf/GWMOL/retirement-deadlines-checklist.pdf [11/7/16]

 

Why It Might Be Time for the Fed to Raise Rates

In doing so, the central bank would cast a vote of confidence in the economy.

Provided by Mike Moffitt

Will the Federal Reserve make a move in December? As our central bank has avoided tightening U.S. monetary policy for nine years, an end-of-year interest rate hike might seem more possible than probable. Call it a strong possibility, if nothing else – after the November 18 release of the October Fed policy meeting minutes, trading in Fed funds futures indicated that investors saw a 68% chance of a December rate hike. In late October, they saw only a 38% chance of that happening.1

The October Fed meeting minutes sent a strong signal. They noted that “most” Federal Open Market Committee members thought that conditions for a rate increase “could well be met by the time of the next meeting,” with another passage stating that “it may well become appropriate to initiate the normalization process” at that time.2

Investors want some certainty when it comes to monetary policy. The S&P 500 advanced 1.6% on November 18, carried by gains in financial shares (banks would benefit greatly from higher interest rates). It was the biggest one-day rally U.S. equities had seen in a month. After the FOMC elected to refrain from raising rates in both September and October, the question became “when?” To many market observers, the October FOMC meeting minutes seem to provide an answer.1

The next jobs report could be a major influence. In October, the economy added 271,000 new jobs with 2.5% annualized wage growth and unemployment falling to 5.0%. If the next Labor Department employment report shows hiring well above the 200,000 level in November, the Fed could interpret that as a clear green light.2

The Fed would be going against the grain by raising rates in December. The People’s Bank of China has lowered its benchmark interest rate six times since October 2014. The European Central Bank, which has launched a major monetary stimulus, has reduced its key interest rate to 0.05%. Some analysts believe it could hit zero. The ECB’s deposit rate is currently at -0.2%.3,4

Even so, investors might appreciate a decisive Fed move. The markets need to have confidence in the Fed, and as CNBC Fast Money panelist Guy Adami recently noted, a hawkish move might be followed by a long dovish interval – the FOMC could raise the federal funds rate in December, then leave it alone until late 2016. That could amount to a best-case scenario for Wall Street.5

Besides placating the market, are there other notable reasons to raise rates? Adami’s Fast Money colleague, Euro Pacific Capital CEO Peter Schiff, begged to differ. On the same broadcast, he shared his opinion that the Fed is standing pat because it feels the economy is not yet strong enough to handle a rate hike. “This is a bubble … not a recovery,” he commented, adding that Wall Street remains in love with easing and “easy money.”5

These points of view aside, many analysts, journalists and market participants see a December rate move (and the tightening that would presumably follow it) as a net positive. As Cuttone & Co. senior vice president Keith Bliss told the Wall Street Journal, “I think it’s a relief for the market that in the opinion of the Fed policy makers the economy is not falling apart.”1  

One thing is certain – the federal funds rate will eventually rise from its current historic low, perhaps very soon, as what should be the first step a tightening cycle. In light of this eventuality, you might want to review your investments and your financial strategy.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com.

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – tinyurl.com/nexyes9 [11/18/15]

2 – foxbusiness.com/economy-policy/2015/11/18/federal-reserve-minutes/ [11/18/15]

3 – reuters.com/article/2015/10/23/us-china-economy-policy-idUSKCN0SH18W20151023 [10/23/15]

4 – usnews.com/news/business/articles/2015/11/18/as-us-prepares-to-hike-rates-europe-could-reap-benefits [11/18/15]

5 – thestreet.com/story/13301410/1/with-latest-fomc-statement-released-will-or-won-t-the-fed-raise-rates.html [11/19/15]

 

 

 

Income inequality and your investment account

A new article came out recently stating that the top 1% of the world population controls $110 trillion of wealth. http://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/bp-working-for-few-political-capture-economic-inequality-200114-summ-en.pdf . I understand that many folks consider this a travesty, but before they get too excited about righting this inequality of wealth, they need to actually “run the numbers” and try to avoid being a hypocrite.

Upon doing a little math, I found many of my clients are in that top 1%. That’s right! Before you get too impressed, consider this: the richest 1% globally control $110 trillion of wealth. There are 7 billion people on earth, so $110 trillion divided by 7 billion equals about $1.5 million each. A farmer client who owns 240 acres of Iowa land (a small farm for those who might not know) or a small business person who owns her business debt free, along with a home and a $500,000 401k, could also fall in that 1%. Heck, a person who can save $275/month and increases that with the inflation rate can get to $1.5 million by retirement age.¹

So to be more fair to the less rich, let’s just take from the “super rich”. That would probably do it, right? Well, according to Forbes list of richest people in the world, the top 50 have roughly $1.2 trillion of wealth.² If you confiscated ALL their wealth, it wouldn’t come close to paying down the total public (government) debt in the world of $52.6 trillion (http://www.economist.com/content/global_debt_clock). It wouldn’t even pay the interest on the debt! And, the $1.2 trillion spread out evenly over every man, woman and child on earth, would give everyone $171.43. Would that pay your cell phone bill for 5 months? Or if you confiscated ALL the wealth of the top 1 percenters and spread it out evenly, everyone would get $15,714.28. For those in third world countries who face REAL poverty, that’s certainly a lot. But in the U.S., although it’s considered poverty, it’s not enough to help most people for any length of time.

How does this affect your investments? When the government attempts to help those in poverty, it spends money on social programs. Since it doesn’t currently bring in enough money through taxes, it borrows the difference from investors with help from the Federal Reserve (our banking system in the U.S.)

Our Federal Reserve creates money out of thin air (“prints” money to increase the money supply) and has been using that money to buy U.S. government-backed debt. That extra money enters our economy.³ Some of it ends up in the hands of citizens. Some spend it, but some save it. For those who save it, some ends up being invested in stocks, some in their businesses, and some in real estate, among other places. This typically pushes asset values higher, which makes those people appear richer….on paper.

They may not be poor but many of them saved that money themselves and they don’t consider themselves rich. When the stock market last crashed, in 2008-2009, many of those people lost nearly 50% of that wealth. Not all of those folks were born with a silver spoon in their mouth. Their plans for a successful retirement hinge on a decent 401k and Social Security. And Social Security is funded by a trust fund expected to be exhausted in around 20 years, with the source of this information being the 2013 Annual Reports summary on the Social Security website itself (http://www.socialsecurity.gov/oact/TRSUM/tr13summary.pdf) and run by a government that is $17 trillion in debt (http://www.treasurydirect.gov/NP/debt/current). The unfunded (future) liabilities of the United States government are projected to be over $127 trillion…more than $1.1 million for every taxpayer alive today.4

So as easy as it is to despise rich people, not all are evil and taking from them won’t come close to solving the problem anyway. And as much as we’d like to think government is the answer, not all government is good and as the debt increases, it probably means much larger problems and much less wealth for everyone when the bubbles pop again like some did in 2008-2009.

Towards that end, we run what-if stress testing scenarios for our clients simulating multiple economic events that could impact their life’s savings, helping them understand the very REAL consequences of actions by governments, terrorists, and the like. Being informed about, and in charge of, your portfolio is the best way to understand and deal with the certainty of uncertainty that affects our life.

Finally, if you really think that rich people have more influence over government than poor people, you may be right. But by that logic, we should all vote for smaller government. There would be fewer people in the government to influence and a chance to reduce the federal debt, which may help save Social Security in the future for us and our kids. If we achieve wealth equality, we’ll need it!

¹annual interest rate 7.5% for 45 years, increasing contributions by an inflation rate of 2.5% and compounding annually. For illustrative purposes only. Not based on any specific investments. Investing in securities involves risk, including potential loss of principal.

² http://www.forbes.com/billionaires/list/

³http://www.independent.com/news/2012/feb/25/how-us-federal-reserve-creates-and-destroys-money/

4http://www.usdebtclock.org/

The opinions voiced in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual.

Investing involves risk including loss of principal.