Articles tagged with: saving

Saving $1 Million for Retirement

 

How can you plan to do it? What kind of financial commitment will it take?

How many of us will retire with $1 million or more in savings? More of us ought to – in fact, more of us may need to, given inflation and the rising cost of health care.

Sadly, few pre-retirees have accumulated that much. A 2015 Government Accountability Office analysis found that the average American aged 55-64 had just $104,000 in retirement money. A 2016 GoBankingRates survey determined that only 13% of Americans had retirement savings of $300,000 or more.1,2

A $100,000 or $300,000 retirement fund might be acceptable if our retirements lasted less than a decade, as was the case for some of our parents. As many of us may live into our eighties and nineties, we may need $1 million or more in savings to avoid financial despair in our old age.

The earlier you begin saving, the more you can take advantage of compound interest. A 25-year-old who directs $405 a month into a tax-advantaged retirement account yielding an average of 7% annually will wind up with $1 million at age 65. Perhaps $405 a month sounds like a lot to devote to this objective, but it only gets harder if you wait. At the same rate of return, a 30-year-old would need to contribute $585 per month to the same retirement account to generate $1 million by age 65.3

The Census Bureau says that the median household income in this country is $53,657. A 45-year-old couple earning that much annually would need to hoard every cent they made for 19 years (and pay no income tax) to end up with $1 million at age 64, absent of investments. So, investing may come to be an important part of your retirement plan.4

What if you are over 40, what then? You still have a chance to retire with $1 million or more, but you must make a bigger present-day financial commitment to that goal than someone younger.

At age 45, you will need to save around $1,317 per month in a tax-advantaged retirement account yielding 10% annually to have $1 million in 20 years. If the account returns just 6% annually, then you would need to direct approximately $2,164 a month into it.4

What if you start trying to build that $1 million retirement fund at age 50? If your retirement account earns a solid 10% per year, you would still need to put around $2,413 a month into it; at a 6% yearly return, the target contribution becomes about $3,439 a month.4

This math may be startling, but it is also hard to argue with. If you are between age 55-65 and have about $100,000 in retirement savings, you may be hard-pressed to adequately finance your future. There are three basic ways to respond to this dilemma. You can choose to live on Social Security, plus the principal and yield from your retirement fund, and risk running out of money within several years (or sooner). Alternately, you can cut your expenses way down – share housing, share or forgo a car, etc., which could preserve more of your money. Or, you could try to work longer, giving your invested retirement savings a chance for additional growth, and explore ways to create new income streams.

How long will a million-dollar retirement fund last? If it is completely uninvested, you could draw down about $35,000 a year from it for 28 years. The upside here is that your invested retirement assets could grow and compound notably during your “second act” to help offset the ongoing withdrawals. The downside is that you will have to contend with inflation and, potentially, major healthcare expenses, which could reduce your savings faster than you anticipate.

So, while $1 million may sound like a huge amount of money to amass for retirement, it really is not – certainly not for a retirement beginning twenty or thirty years from now. Having $2 million or $3 million on hand would be preferable.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email:  mikem@cfgiowa.com.

Website:  www.cfgiowa.com

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Citations.

1 – investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/011216/average-retirement-savings-age-2016.asp [12/8/16]

2 – time.com/money/4258451/retirement-savings-survey/ [3/14/16]

3 – interest.com/retirement-planning/news/how-to-save-1-million-for-retirement/ [12/12/16]

4 – reviewjournal.com/business/money/how-realistically-save-1-million-retirement [5/20/16]

 

 

 

Taking Taxes Into Account When Saving & Investing

It isn’t always top of mind, but it should be.

How many of us save and invest with an eye on tax implications? Not that many of us, according to a recent survey from Russell Investments (the global asset manager overseeing the Russell 2000). In the opening quarter of 2014, Russell polled financial services professionals and asked them how many of their clients had inquired about tax-sensitive investment strategies. Just 35% of the polled financial professionals reported clients wanting information about them, and just 18% said their clients proactively wanted to discuss the matter.1

Good financial professionals aren’t shy about bringing this up, of course. In the Russell survey, 75% of respondents said that they made tax-managed investments available to their clients.1

When is the ideal time to address tax matters? The end of a year can prompt many investors to think about tax issues. Investors’ biggest concerns may include any sudden changes to tax law. Congress often saves such changes for the eleventh hour. Sometimes they present opportunities, other times unwelcome surprises.

The problem is that your time frame can be pretty short once December rolls around. You can’t always pull off that year-end charitable donation, gift of appreciated securities, or extra retirement plan contribution; sometimes your financial situation or sheer logistics get in the way. It is better to think about these things in July or January, or simply year-round.

While thinking about the tax implications of your investments year-round may seem like a chore, it may save you some money. Your financial services professional can help you stay aware of the tax ramifications of certain financial moves.

Think about taxes as you contribute to your retirement accounts. Do you contribute to a qualified retirement plan at work? In doing so, you can lower your taxable income (and your yearly tax liability). Why? Those contributions are made with pre-tax dollars. In 2014, you can contribute up to $17,500 to a 401(k) or 403(b) account or the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan. If you are 50 or older this year, you can put in up to $23,000 into these accounts. The same is true for most 457 plans. This can reduce your taxable income and lower your tax bill.2,4

Think about where you want to live when you retire. Certain states have high personal income tax rates affecting wealthy households, and others don’t levy state income tax at all. If you are wealthy and want to retire in a state with higher rates, a Roth IRA may start to look pretty good versus a traditional IRA. Withdrawals from a Roth IRA aren’t taxed (assuming the Roth IRA owner follows IRS rules), because contributions to a Roth are made with after-tax dollars. Distributions you take from a traditional IRA in retirement will be taxed.2

What capital gains tax rate will you face on a particular investment? In 2013, the long-term capital gains tax rate became 20% for high earners, up from 15%. On top of that, the Affordable Care Act Surtax of 3.8% effectively took the long-term capital gains tax rate to 23.8% for investors earning more than $200,000.2,3

Greater capital gains taxes can actually be levied in some cases. Take the case of real estate depreciation. If you sell real property that you have depreciated, part of your gain will be taxed at 25%. The long-term capital gains tax rate for collectibles is 28%. Own any qualified small business stock? If you have owned it for over five years, you typically can exclude 50% of any gains from income, but the other 50% will be taxed at 28%. Lastly, if you sell an asset you’ve held for less than a year, the money you realize from that sale will be taxed at the short-term rate (i.e., regular income), which could be as high as 39.6%.2,3

Are you deducting all you can? The mortgage interest deduction is not always noticed by taxpayers. If a home loan exceeds $1.1 million, interest above that amount may not qualify for a deduction. Itemizing can be a pain, but may bring you more tax savings than you anticipate.2

A tax-sensitive investing approach is always specific to the individual. Therefore, any strategy needs to start with an in-depth discussion with your tax or financial professional.

Michael Moffitt may be reached at phone 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com
website: www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – russell.com/us/newsroom/press-releases/2014/russell-survey-advisors-say-tax-aware-investment-strategies-not-top-of-mind.page? [4/29/14]
2 – foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2014/08/07/investments-and-tax-planning-go-hand-in-hand/ [8/7/14]
3 – bankrate.com/finance/money-guides/capital-gains-tax-rates-1.aspx [3/27/14]
4 – irs.gov/uac/IRS-Announces-2014-Pension-Plan-Limitations;-Taxpayers-May-Contribute-up-to-$17,500-to-their-401%28k%29-plans-in-2014 [11/4/13]

Is this the direction we want to go?

My job as a financial advisor, as I see it, is to help my clients negotiate successfully through their financial life and work toward their goals along the way. But I’ve always felt that for them to be successful, most of the burden falls on them. Just like the old adage says, “if it is to be, it’s up to me.”
I offer what I think is my best advise based on their circumstances and based on what else I see going on in the world that could impact them, either directly or indirectly. As general trends go in our country today, it’s hard to see that we, collectively, are going in a path that will lead us in a positive direction. In my own clients, I see some good savers that are ready for the future but many more that may be scaling back their retirement plans because the money just isn’t there.
Maybe we’ve had it too good the last few decades and so we just didn’t try as hard as our parents. That’s tough for anyone to admit. Do we want to be better? A full 43% of Baby Boomers surveyed by AARP in November 2013 described their present financial situation as “worse than expected.” Craig L. Israelsen suggested in a July 2011 article on the Horsesmouth.com website that U.S workers aren’t saving enough and because of that are pretending that “building a better investment portfolio” will solve their lack-of-saving problem. He correctly states that contributions are largely controllable by the investor, while performance, particularly in the short run, is not. It’s easier to blame bad markets for a lack of investment savings than it is to blame a lack of saving, period.
Sometimes not saving is not income-related….you have a good job but simply spend beyond your means. I have little sympathy for those folks. Sometimes people just don’t earn very much or they just can’t find a job. In those cases it is easy to blame tough luck but sometimes that bad luck might be the result of our decisions as well—decisions that could go all the way back to high school or college days!
The National Center for Education Statistics shows that the number of college students graduating in 2012 with a “Mathematics and Statistics” degree was 18,842. It was 24,800 graduates in 1971. A 24% decrease. Conversely, there were 38,993 graduates with “Parks, Recreation, Leisure, and Fitness Studies” degrees in 2012, while only 1,621 such graduates in 1971. That’s an increase of over 2300%! Careers that use a lot of math typically pay more than careers in parks and rec. From that metric it appears we’re going the wrong way. Why is that? Are students choosing the easier majors or are colleges creating an easier degree path to lower paying jobs?
Are we as a society just looking for the easier path? In 2000 there were 8,471,453 people on Federal Income Supplement Program (disability), according to the Social Security Administration. Today there are 14,285,956. Is our workplace really 68% more dangerous than 14 years ago? The USDA says food stamp recipients in 2000 were 17,472,535, today they number 46,548,000. That’s 15 out of every 100 people, versus 6 out of every 100 just 14 years ago. The US Census Bureau says today there’s roughly 37 million more people in the U.S. than in 2000 and there’s 29 million more on food stamps. Really?
I have no doubt that many people, through no fault of their own or through true misfortune, need this government assistance. They should get it. I also have no doubt that even more people are abusing the system because they can. It’s much easier to let someone else carry the load if they will. (See: http://www.worthytoshare.com/pretty-girl-seeking-rich-husband-reply-got-banker-priceless# )
But eventually it may break the back of our country.