Articles tagged with: Long term care insurance

Life Insurance with Long Term Care Riders

As conventional LTC policies grow costlier, alternatives have emerged.

Provided by Mike Moffitt

The price of long term care insurance is really going up. If you are a baby boomer and you have kept your eye on it for a few years, chances are you have noticed much costlier premiums for LTC coverage today compared to several years ago. For example, in 2015 the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance found that married 60-year-olds would pay $2,170 annually to get a total of $328,000 of coverage.1

As CNBC notes, about three-quarters of the insurers that sold LTC policies ten years ago have stopped doing so. Demand for LTC coverage will only grow as more baby boomers retire – and in light of that, insurance providers have introduced new options for those who want to LTC coverage.1

Hybrid LTC products have emerged. Some insurers are structuring “cash rich” whole life insurance policies so you can tap part of the death benefit while living to pay for long term care. You can use up to $330 a day of the death benefit under such policies, with no reduction to the cash value. Other insurance products are being marketed featuring similar potential benefits.2

This option often costs a few hundred dollars more per year – not bad given that level annual premiums on a whole life policy with a half-million or million-dollar payout often come to several thousand dollars. The policyholder becomes eligible for the LTC coverage when he or she is judged to require assistance with two or more of six daily living activities (dressing, bathing, eating, etc.) or is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or some other kind of cognitive deficiency.2

This way, you can get what you want from one insurance policy rather than having to pay for two. Contrast that with a situation in which you buy a discrete LTC policy but die without requiring any long term care, with the premiums on that policy paid for nothing.

The basics of securing LTC coverage applies to these policies. As with a standard LTC policy, the earlier you start paying premiums for one of these hybrid insurance products, the lower the premiums will likely be. You must pass medical underwriting to qualify for coverage. The encouraging news here is that some people who are not healthy enough to qualify for a standalone LTC insurance policy may qualify for a hybrid policy.3

Are these hybrid policies just mediocre compromises? They have detractors as well as fans, and the detractors cite the fact that a standalone LTC policy generally offers greater LTC coverage per premium dollar paid than a hybrid policy. They also cite their two sets of fees, per their two forms of insurance coverage. While it is possible to deduct the cost of premiums paid on a conventional LTC policy, hybrid policies allow no such opportunity.3

Paying a lump sum premium at the inauguration of the policy has both an upside and a downside. You will not contend with potential premium increases over time, as owners of stock LTC policies often do; on the other hand, the return on the insurance product may be locked into today’s (minimal) interest rates.

Another reality is that many middle-class seniors have little or no need to go out and buy a life insurance policy. Their heirs will not face inheritance taxes, because their estates aren’t large enough to exceed the federal estate tax exemption. Moreover, their children may be adults and financially stable themselves; a large death benefit for these heirs is nice, but the opportunity cost of paying the life insurance premiums may be significant.4

Cash value life insurance can be a crucial element in estate planning for those with large or complex estates, however – and if some of its death benefit can be directed toward long term care for the policyholder, it may prove even more useful than commonly assumed.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at 641-782-5577 or mikem@cfgiowa.com.

Website: www.cfgiowa.com

 

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

 Riders are additional guarantee options that are available to an annuity or life insurance contract holder. While some riders are part of an existing contract, many others may carry additional fees, charges and restrictions, and the policy holder should review their contract carefully before purchasing. Guarantees are based on the claims paying ability of the issuing insurance company.

 Life insurance policies contain exclusions, limitations, reductions of benefits, and terms for keeping them in force. Your financial professional can provide you with costs and complete details.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Citations.

1 – cnbc.com/2015/08/07/fer-more-products-that-cover-long-term-care-costs.html [8/7/15]

2 – consumerreports.org/cro/news/2015/04/get-long-term-care-from-whole-life-insurance/index.htm [4/16/15]

3 – tinyurl.com/o3ty2j3 [5/4/14]

4 – marketwatch.com/story/hedging-your-bets-on-long-term-care-2013-11-06 [11/6/13]

 

Planning for Retirement When You Are Single

If you aren’t married, you should consider these potential expenses & needs.

How does retirement planning differ for single people? At a glance, there would seem to be no difference in the retirement saving effort of an individual versus the retirement saving effort of a couple: start early, save consistently, and use vehicles that allow tax-advantaged growth and compounding of invested assets.

On closer inspection, differences do appear – factors that single adults should pay attention to while planning for the future.

Retirement savings must be built off one income. Unmarried adults should save for retirement early and avidly. Most couples have the luxury of creating retirement nest eggs from either or both of two incomes. They can plan to build wealth with a degree of flexibility and synchronization that is unavailable to a single saver. So when it comes to building retirement assets, a single adult has to start early, save big and never let up, as there is no spouse around to help in the effort and only one income from which savings can emerge.

The Social Security claiming decision takes on more importance. An unmarried person’s Social Security benefits are calculated off his or her lifetime earnings record. Simple, cut and dried.1

Married people, however, have an option that the unmarried lack. Once their spouses begin to collect Social Security, they have a chance to claim a spousal benefit as early as age 62 rather than wait for benefits based solely on their own earnings. In fact, they may be able to claim this spousal benefit at age 62 even if they are widowed or divorced. If they are caring for a son or daughter from that marriage who is also receiving some form of Social Security benefits, they may be eligible for a spousal benefit before age 62.2,3  

All this means that a couple can potentially rely on two Social Security incomes before both spouses reach what the program deems full retirement age. An unmarried person cannot exploit that opportunity, so the decision to claim Social Security early at reduced monthly benefits or postpone claiming to receive greater benefits becomes critical.

An unmarried person may someday have a huge need for long term care insurance. If there are no adult children or spouse around to serve as caretakers in the event of a debilitating mental or physical breakdown, an unmarried individual may eventually become destitute from costs linked to that sad consequence. LTC coverage is growing more expensive and fewer carriers are offering it these days, so many married baby boomers are wondering if it is really worth the expense; in the case of a single, unmarried baby boomer retiring solo, it may be.

Housing is often the largest expense for the unmarried. In an ideal world, a single adult could pay half of the monthly housing expense of a married couple. That seldom happens. Relatively speaking, housing costs usually consume much more of a sole individual’s income than the income of a couple. This is true even early in life: according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data, married folks in their late twenties spend $7,200 per person less on housing expenses annually. So a single person would do well to find ways to cut down housing expenses, as this frees up more money that can be potentially assigned to retirement saving.1

Saving when single presents distinct challenges. In fact, saving for retirement (or any other financial goal) as a single, unmarried person is often more challenging than it is for a married couple – especially in light of the fact that spouses are given some distinct federal tax advantages. Still, the effort must be made. Start as early as you can, and save consistently.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email mikem@cfgiowa.com

Website: www.cfgiowa.com 

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.

1 – mainstreet.com/article/retirement-planning-for-singles-how-going-it-alone-makes-saving-different [9/17/15]

2 – oregonlive.com/business/index.ssf/2015/09/dont_miss_out_on_spousal_socia.html [9/21/15]

3 – ssa.gov/planners/retire/applying6.html [9/24/15]

Hybrid Insurance Products with Long-Term Care Riders

With the cost of long term care insurance rising, they are gaining attention.

Could these products answer a financial dilemma? Many high net worth households worry about potential long term care expenses, but they are reluctant or unable to buy long term care insurance. According to a 2014 report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, less than 8% of U.S. households have purchased LTCI.1

Long term care insurance (LTCI) policies have a “use it or lose it” aspect of the coverage: if the insured party dies abruptly, all those insurance premiums will have been paid for nothing. If the household is wealthy enough, maybe it can forego buying a LTC policy and absorb some or all of possible LTC costs using existing assets.

Are there alternatives allowing some flexibility here? Yes. Recently, more attention has come to hybrid LTC policies and hybrid LTC annuities. These are hybrid insurance products: life insurance policies and annuities with an option to buy a long term care insurance rider for additional cost. They are gaining favor: sales of hybrid LTC policies alone rose by 24% in 2012, according to the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance’s 2014 LTCi Sourcebook. Typically, the people most interested in these hybrid products are a) wealthy couples concerned about the increasing costs of traditional LTCI coverage, b) annuity holders outside of their surrender period who need long term care coverage. Being able to draw on LTCI if the moment arises can be a relief.2

They can be implemented with a lump sum. Often, assets from a CD or a savings account are used to fund the annuity or life insurance policy (the policy is often single-premium). In the case of a hybrid LTC policy, the bulk of the policy’s death benefit can be tapped and used as LTC benefits if the need arises. In the case of a hybrid LTC annuity, the money poured into the annuity is usually directed into a fixed-income investment, with the immediate or deferred annuity payments increasing if the annuity holder requires LTC.2,3

What if the annuity or policy holder passes away suddenly, or dies with LTC benefits left over? If that happens with a hybrid LTC policy, you still have a life insurance policy in place. His or her heirs will receive a tax-free death benefit. It is also possible in certain cases to surrender the policy and even get the initial premium back, however you must have a “Return of Premium” rider in place, which comes as an additional cost to the policy. The annuity holder, of course, names a beneficiary – and if he or she doesn’t need long term care, there is still an immediate or deferred income stream from the annuity contract.3

There are some trade-offs for the LTC coverage. Costs of these products are usually defined by the insurer as “guaranteed” – LTCI premiums are fixed, and the value of the policy or annuity will never be less than the lump sum it was established with (though a small surrender charge might be levied in the first few years of the annuity). In exchange for that, some hybrid LTC policies accumulate no cash value, and some hybrid LTC annuity products offer less than fair market returns.4

Tax-free withdrawals may be used to pay for LTC expenses. Thanks to the Pension Protection Act of 2006, the following privileges were granted regarding hybrid insurance products:

*All claims paid directly from appreciated hybrid LTC annuities and hybrid LTC policies are income tax free so long as they are used to pay qualified long term care expenses. In using the cash value to cover LTC expenses, you are not triggering a taxable event.2,4 

*Owners of traditional life insurance policies and annuities are now allowed to make 1035 exchanges into appropriate hybrid LTC products without incurring taxable gains.2

If you shop for a hybrid insurance product, shop carefully. The first hybrid LTC policy or hybrid LTC annuity you lay eyes on may not be the cheapest, so look around before you leap and make sure the product is reasonably tailored to your financial objectives and needs. Remember that annuity contracts are not “guaranteed” by any federal agency; the “guarantee” is a pledge from the insurer. If you decide to back out of these arrangements, you need to know that some insurers will not return your premiums. Also, keep in mind that over the long run, the return on these hybrid products will likely not match the return on a conventional fixed annuity or LTCI policy; actuarially speaking, when interest rates rise there is no incentive for the insurer to adjust the fixed income rate of return in response.2,4

Are hybrid insurance products for you? If you can’t qualify medically for LTCI but still want coverage, they may represent worthy options that you can start with a lump sum. You might want to talk to your insurance or financial consultant about the possibility.

Mike Moffitt may be reached at ph# 641-782-5577 or email: mikem@cfgiowa.com

website:  www.cfgiowa.com

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

 Life insurance policies contain exclusions, limitations, reductions of benefits, and terms for keeping them in force. Your financial professional can provide you with costs and complete details.

Fixed annuities are long-term investment vehicles designed for retirement purposes. Gains from tax-deferred investments are taxable as ordinary income upon withdrawal. Withdrawals made prior to age 59 ½ are subject to a 10% IRS penalty tax and surrender charges may apply.

Guarantees are based on the claims paying ability of the issuing company.

Riders are additional guarantee options that are available to an annuity or life insurance contract holder. While some riders are part of an existing contract, many others may carry additional fees, charges and restrictions, and the policy holder should review their contract carefully before purchasing.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

  Citations.

1 – rwjf.org/content/dam/farm/reports/issue_briefs/2014/rwjf410654 [2/14]

2 – forbes.com/sites/jamiehopkins/2014/04/21/new-and-unexpected-ways-to-fund-long-term-care-expenses/ [4/21/14]

3 – fa-mag.com/news/hybrid-ltc-insurance-gains-traction-among-the-affluent-17070.html [2/25/14]

4 – kitces.com/blog/is-the-ltc-cost-guarantee-of-todays-hybrid-lifeltc-or-annuityltc-insurance-policies-just-a-mirage/ [10/16/13]

How LTC Insurance Can Help Protect Your Assets

Create a pool of healthcare dollars that will grow in any market.

How will you pay for long term care? The sad fact is that most people don’t know the answer to that question. But a solution is available.
As baby boomers leave their careers behind, long term care insurance will become very important in their financial strategies. The reasons to get an LTC policy after age 50 are very compelling.
Your premium payments buy you access to a large pool of money which can be used to pay for long term care costs. By paying for LTC out of that pool of money, you can preserve your retirement savings and income.
The cost of assisted living or nursing home care alone could motivate you to pay the premiums. AARP and Genworth Financial conduct an annual Cost of Care Survey to gauge the price of long term care. The 2008 survey found that
• The national average annual cost of a private room in a nursing home is $76,460 – $209 per day, and 17% higher than it was in 2004.
• A private one-bedroom unit in an assisted living facility averages $36,090 annually – and that is 25% higher than it was in 2004.
• The average annual payments to a non-Medicare certified, state-licensed home health aide are $43,884.1
Can you imagine spending an extra $30-80K out of your retirement savings in a year? What if you had to do it for more than one year?
AARP notes that approximately 60% of people over age 65 will require some kind of long term care during their lifetimes.2
Why procrastinate? The earlier you opt for LTC coverage, the cheaper the premiums. This is why many people purchase it before they retire. Those in poor health or over the age of 80 are frequently ineligible for coverage.
What it pays for. Some people think LTC coverage just pays for nursing home care. Not true: it can pay for a wide variety of nursing, social, and rehabilitative services at home and away from home, for people with a chronic illness or disability or people who just need assistance bathing, eating or dressing.3
Choosing a DBA. That stands for Daily Benefit Amount, which is the maximum amount your LTC plan will pay for one day’s care in a nursing home facility. You can choose a Daily Benefit Amount when you pay for your LTC coverage, and you can also choose the length of time that you may receive the full DBA every day. The DBA typically ranges from a few dozen dollars to hundreds of dollars. Some of these plans offer you “inflation protection” at enrollment, meaning that every few years, you will have the chance to buy additional coverage and get compounding – so your pool of money can grow.
The Medicare misconception. Too many people think Medicare will pick up the cost of long term care. Medicare is not long term care insurance. Medicare will only pay for the first 100 days of nursing home care, and only if 1) you are receiving skilled care and 2) you go into the nursing home right after a hospital stay of at least 3 days. Medicare also covers limited home visits for skilled care, and some hospice services for the terminally ill. That’s all.2
Now, Medicaid can actually pay for long term care – if you are destitute. Are you willing to wait until you are broke for a way to fund long term care? Of course not. LTC insurance provides a way to do it.
Why not look into this? You may have heard that LTC insurance is expensive compared with some other forms of policies. But the annual premiums (about as much as you’d spend on a used car from the mid-1990s) are nothing compared to real-world LTC costs.4 Ask your Cornerstone Financial Group advisor about some of the LTC choices you can explore – while many Americans have life, health and disability insurance, that’s not the same thing as long term care coverage.

Michael Moffitt is a Registered Representative with and Securities are offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investments advice offered through Advantage Investment Management (AIM), a registered investment advisor. Cornerstone Financial Group and AIM are separate entities from LPL Financial.

Michael Moffitt contact information is as follows: Phone 641-782-5577, email mikem@cfgiowa.com, website cfgiowa.com

This was prepared by Peter Montoya Inc., not the named Representative nor Broker/Dealer, and should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representative nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information.

Citations.
1 aarp.org/states/nj/articles/genworth_releases_2008_cost_of_care_survey_results.html [4/29/08]
2 aarp.org/families/caregiving/caring_help/what_does_long_term_care_cost.html [11/11/08]
3 pbs.org/nbr/site/features/special/article/long-term-care-insurance_SP/ [11/11/08]
4 aarp.org/research/health/privinsurance/fs7r_ltc.html [6/07]